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US Elsevier announces seven new plastics and polymers books at SPE ANTEC 2016 - 23 May 2016

STM publisher Elsevier has announced the publication of new, fully updated editions of Fatigue and Tribological Properties of Plastics and Elastomers and Multilayer Flexible Packaging. Reflecting the rapid advances made in the field, these two highly anticipated books, along with five additional new plastics and polymers titles, will be featured in Elsevier's booth # 227 at SPE ANTEC 2016, May 23-25, in Indianapolis, IN.

The third edition of Fatigue and Tribological Properties of Plastics and Elastomers is written by Dr. Laurence McKeen, a former DuPont senior research associate. This definitive book for engineers and scientists in the plastics industry and in product design with plastics, covers fatigue and tribology and has been updated to address the many advancements since the previous edition. It includes a new chapter covering sustainable and biodegradable polymers.

Edited by John R. Wagner, Jr., editor-in-chief of the Journal of Plastic Film and Sheeting, and a member of the SPE Extrusion Division Board of Directors, the second edition of Multilayer Flexible Packaging provides a thorough introduction to the manufacturing and applications of flexible plastic films, covering materials, hardware and processes, and multilayer film designs and applications. It includes a new chapter on the use of bio-based polymers in flexible packaging.

In order to meet content needs in plastics and polymers, Elsevier uses proprietary tools to identify the gaps in coverage of the topics. Editorial teams strategically fill those gaps with content written by key influencers in the field, giving students, faculty and researchers the content they need to answer challenging questions and improve outcomes. These new books, which will educate the next generation of plastics and polymer experts and provide critical foundational content for information professionals, are key examples of how Elsevier is enabling science to drive innovation.

The seven new plastics and polymers books are: Fatigue and Tribological Properties of Plastics and Elastomers, Third Edition by Laurence McKeen; Multilayer Flexible Packaging, Second Edition by John R. Wagner, Jr.; Spectroscopy of Polymer Nanocomposites by Sabu Thomas, Didier Rouxel and Deepalekshmi Ponnamma; Handbook of Polymers, 2nd Edition by George Wypych; Handbook of Fillers, 4th Edition by George Wypych; Industrial Oil Crops by Thomas McKeon, Douglas Hayes, David Hildebrand and Randall Weselake; and Introduction to Bioplastics Engineering by Syed Ali Ashter.

Elsevier will be giving away a book a day at its SPE ANTEC booth, where attendees will also be able to meet Acquisitions Editor David Jackson.

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US The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons announces OA option - 23 May 2016

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), the preeminent provider of musculoskeletal education to orthopaedic surgeons and others in the world, and its publishing partner of the AAOS, Wolters Kluwer, have announced that the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS) will begin offering an open access publishing option for authors of manuscripts accepted for publication.

Authors of manuscripts who opt for the open access choice retain copyright to their work and AAOS will make the work freely available online to anyone wishing to access it.

The AAOS Board of Directors authorised the implementation of the Open Access option for JAAOS at its May 14th meeting. The JAAOS open access option will be offered to all authors whose work is accepted for publication after June 1, 2016 and going forward.

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Information and Publishing Services

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US Nominations for eight seats on the IDPF Board of Directors now open - 23 May 2016

Nominations are now open for eight seats on the IDPF Board of Directors. The IDPF Board (fourteen members including the President) is elected by the members to manage the organization's business and affairs. This includes developing the vision and strategic plan and providing oversight and direction to staff and volunteers carrying out the work. Directors serve two-year terms. At least one new Director will be elected, as one seat in this class is vacant. Self-nominations are due by May 31, 2016 5:00pm U.S. ET and are open to anyone who is or becomes an IDPF member organisation's Primary Representative.

Being a board member of the IDPF is a significant commitment. The Board and executive staff currently meet monthly via teleconference, and usually twice a year in a face-to-face meeting, along with additional collaboration as needed. Board time and expenses are not reimbursed. Prospective members should be leaders in their organisations and have a clear understanding of one or more segments of the digital publishing industry. Familiarity with EPUB and related technologies is helpful; however specific technical expertise is not required. Board meetings are conducted in English with accommodations for non-native English speakers. Remote meetings are scheduled to facilitate participation across multiple time zones.

As recently announced, the IDPF and the W3C are exploring a potential combination and are in the process of soliciting member feedback. The timing of this election was adjusted to support members' and candidates' informed participation in this process, and the Board Nominating Committee (optional in our bylaws but used in 2014 and 2015) will be inactive during this cycle.

The expectation is that a final decision to approve any combination would be by member vote, to be called for by the Board if deemed appropriate after further communication, feedback, and consideration. The Board's decision whether to call for such a vote will be made after a period of communication (expected to continue at least through mid-July) thus after newly elected board members are seated. Candidates should therefore be prepared to be actively involved in the process, and candidates are urged to begin that process now by participating in the information sharing and outreach that the IDPF Board and leadership are engaging in with members.

Self-nomination statements will be published to the IDPF website upon receipt. Candidates will have the option to modify their statements at any time until the conclusion of the election process. The Board election will be open from June 1 through June 17, 2016.

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Partnership programs / consortiums

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US Institutional budgets will increase by 1.4% in 2016, says PCG Library Budget Survey - 23 May 2016

Results of the 2016 Library Budget Predictions survey, research carried out annually by Ingenta's publishing consultancy arm, Publishers Communication Group (PCG), have been released, stating that institutional library budgets across the globe will increase by 1.4 percent overall this year.

Despite the rise in library budgets overall, the mature markets measured in the survey show very limited expansion. North America predicts a 1 percent increase in its overall budget spend for 2016, whereas the situation in Europe is slightly worse, with a 0.1 percent decrease anticipated overall. Although regions containing predominantly emerging markets predict growth, this is generally at a lower level than previously. Somewhat more optimistically, however, South America expects growth of 2.1 percent (5.9% for 2015) and the Middle East and Africa continues to predict the greatest proportional increase at 4.2 percent, although this too is down compared to last year's 6.8 percent predicted rise. Asia Pacific, influenced by China and India (emerging) and Japan (mature), balance out somewhat with an expected 2.8 percent increase.

Across the main budget lines, the survey uncovered that materials budgets (all information content provision) are anticipated to increase by 1.2 percent, serials by 1.4 percent and books by 1.3 percent. Spending patterns regionally broadly reflect the overall budget. Notably, North America predicts a 1.9 percent increase on its books budget whilst only increasing serials by 0.2 percent.

These tight serials budgets mean that librarians face challenges to balance the needs of their users alongside their available funding. This is demonstrated in the plans for additions and cancellations of serials. Overall, it is expected that an average of 52 serials will be added, while 75 will be cancelled. The emerging countries segment shows quite a different picture: 228 serials are expected to be added with just 14 cancellations on average. When asked how decisions on budget prioritisations are made, librarians tell us that they use several indicators – usage figures are considered by 88 percent of librarians, and 76 percent take feedback from users into account.

The research examined the usage of institutional search and discovery tools (which includes services such as Summon) as well as reference management tools. Responses across the board show that neither of these services could be described as having 'widespread' usage. While 76 percent of respondents are aware of institutional discovery tools, only 28 percent had already purchased such a service with a further 10 percent plan to invest in these in the near future. Reference management tools are better embedded however, with 58 percent already providing a service, with that figure rising to 68 percent in the academic community.

A global telephone survey was carried out at 686 institutional libraries in North America, South America, Europe, Asia Pacific and Middle East and Africa. Senior librarians with control over and knowledge of library budgets for 2016 were contacted. Academic institutions were split into categories reflecting the size and research focus level of their institute.

The data in this study has been weighted to reflect the global contribution of each country to library spend. All counts in the report are based on the weighted number of responses, rather than the actual number.

PCG is now beginning the process of collecting data for 2017 library budget predictions.

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Netherland OASPA webinar panelists discuss attribution - 23 May 2016

Cameron Neylon from Curtin University, Michael Carroll from American University, and Ernesto Priego from the City University London recently joined OASPA for a webinar to discuss attribution in open access publishing - an important, timely issue for publishers that goes hand-in-hand with licensing. Catriona MacCallum (PLOS) chaired the discussion. The Copyright Clearance Center hosted the webinar.

Catriona MacCallum opened the discussion by noting that Creative Commons licenses have become the standard means by which credit can be given to authors in open access publishing. Any potential membership applicant to OASPA, Catriona continued, must have at least one journal which features 'CC-BY', or in some cases 'CC BY-NC' content, which allows those accessing research to remix, tweak, and build upon work, while acknowledging the original author in the process. But there are ongoing challenges in the attribution realm: unclear licensing frameworks, differing community norms of content reuse, and varying disciplinary attitudes to attribution. Catriona handed over to Cameron Neylon, who presented on the topic, with Michael Carroll and Ernesto Priego as respondents.

Cameron began by underlining the importance of attribution. Those working on and interested in open access share a common belief in the maximum amount of people being able to 'take content and research outputs, and make them available in a form that others can use in ways that we haven't yet thought about.' Licensing, Cameron argued, is at the centre of open access publishing work: having a common set of licenses expresses a set of values around content reuse, but also enables legal consistency around reuse. Importantly, he continued, the use of such licenses lay the foundation for interoperability – information to flow between communities, not just within them.

Core to licensing, Cameron noted, is attribution. But unlike the consistency seen in licensing behaviours and values, attribution is often inconsistently expressed. Attribution, he cautioned, is not citation: citation is a bibliographic practice particular to research to enable someone else to find the work you are describing, whereas attribution is a 'legal requirement under Creative Commons licenses to recognize the copyright holder'. To 'attribute' does not simply mean to cite the work of the author you are reusing, since authors are not always the copyright holders.

Attribution could be made more interoperable and more consistent, argued Cameron, by actively making use of the four proposed attribution principles set out in an OASPA document, Getting the Credit.

Cameron pointed out that by thinking through case studies and day-to-day attribution practices, the OASPA principles go some way to tackle the particular challenges of third-party marketers failing to properly attribute academic content, and of the difficulty humanities scholars have found in having translated work attributed correctly. Many translation-related challenges, for example, can be overcome by making attribution very explicit. Beyond the establishment of attribution principles, Cameron wondered if the creation of stock examples of how to attribute would be helpful to distribute, if further education was needed around standard forms of attribution, and if so, what form guidance should take – and who should take responsibility for enforcing any rules.

Cameron then moved onto explore the attribution-licensing relationship. Cameron explained that Creative Commons licenses bind together the author and the user of the content through attribution, while a separate 'license to publish' creates the relationship between the author and the publisher. Attribution requirements by the publisher then establish the relationship between the publisher and content users – which may differ between publishers. There may be real opportunities, argued Cameron, for publishers to standardise their publisher-user attribution guidelines.

In response, Ernesto Priego remarked that within the humanities realm, difficulties lie in third-party content being reused with Creative Commons licenses when the original author did not intend it to be. To navigate this challenge, publishers such as the Open Library of Humanities have CC-BY as their licensing default, but offer other licensing options, and the journal Ernesto edits, Comics Grid, has a special clause for third-party content re-users. He cautioned that standardisation, especially around third-party content, is still needed however.

Following on from this, Michael Carroll wondered if attribution is often described in too complex a fashion. Users need to be aware of the copyright status of the content they are working with, and the source of their right to use it. Creative Commons licenses provide people with the means to attribute, but without being too specific about how authors satisfy the legal conditions of licenses. This, he argues, enables flexibility in the way materials are presented. But the addition of the statement of attribution principles, he continued, is important: it encourages the open access publishing community to come together and think about how to make 'attribution and citation synonymous'. Standardisation of attribution practices, rather than competition, Michael noted, would be most beneficial to the community. Ernesto agreed with this analysis, adding that CC-BY licensing has generally been well taken-up by the humanities community. In response, Cameron commented that he hoped that the establishment of standardised attribution practices would build a 'stronger knowledge network'.

In the Q&A session, Cameron was asked if the ORCID ID would ever be used as a standard citation. Certainly there are ways of this being taken up in the future, Cameron replied. Catriona followed this up with a question on data held in repositories or the paper itself: how was attribution for data different to that for publications? Cameron answered that often, there is very little copyright associated with data – and that as a result, it is often better placed into the public domain.

Publishers are well placed to lead the way in standardising attribution practices and OASPA looks forward to further discussions on developing attribution standards – and how these could be implemented across different disciplines.

The recording of this webinar, along with the accompanying slides, can be found on the OASPA website http://oaspa.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/OASPA-Webinar-Attribution-20160505-1402-1.mp4.

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US Portico announces preservation deals with SciPress and the Association for Research and Vision in Ophthalmology - 23 May 2016

Digital preservation specialist Portico has announced that SciPress will preserve e-journals with Portico, ensuring that they will be secure and available into the future.

SciPress is a scientific publishing house located in Switzerland, near Zurich, with a strong focus on theoretical and applied physical sciences, engineering, earth sciences, social sciences and humanities. All over the world SciPress provides web open access to databases of scientific research in various fields, written as high quality stand-alone papers or compiled as special topic volumes, proceedings of international conferences and monographs.

In a related announcement, Portico announced a preservation deal with the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO), ensuring that they will be secure and available into the future.

The Association for Research and Vision in Ophthalmology (ARVO) claims to be the largest eye and vision research organisation in the world. Members include nearly 12,000 eye and vision researchers from over 75 countries. Through its members, journals and other programs, ARVO advances research worldwide into understanding the visual system and preventing, treating and curing its disorders. ARVO's three online, open access peer-reviewed journals are Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, Journal of Vision and Translational Vision Science & Technology.

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Digital Asset Management Platform
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UK Ex Libris in deal with GreenData, expands operations in Spanish Market - 23 May 2016

Ex Libris®, a ProQuest company, has announced that it is increasing its investment in the Spanish market and has reached an agreement with its Barcelona-based partner, GreenData, that will see Ex Libris playing a direct role in the Spanish market.

Under the agreement, GreenData will remain an Ex Libris business development partner while the marketing, sales, and support responsibilities will move to Ex Libris. GreenData's solutions experts, sales team, and support personnel for Ex Libris products will become part of the Ex Libris team and will continue to operate from GreenData's Barcelona office.

The expanded team will also work closely with Madrid-based Ex Libris and ProQuest staff, thus increasing the size and reach of Ex Libris in Spain.

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Library information/solutions provider

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India Latest edition of Blogspeak now online - 23 May 2016

The latest edition of Blogspeak is now online. Featured are: SSP website (SSP and STM Collaborate to Promote the Value of Mentorship in Scholarly Communications for Early-Career Professionals); Xuan Yu (Harvest Tiny Data in Scientific Papers); Stephen Lotinga (Think academic publishers are greedy? Do your research); Thomas Leeper (Elsevier purchase SSRN: Social scientists face questions over whether centralised repository is in their interests); Rick Anderson (Sci-Hub and Academic Identity Theft: An Open Letter to University Faculty Everywhere); and Michael S. Evans (Portable Journal Acceptance?). Blogspeak includes blog posts relevant to the publishing industry, particularly STM publishing. Subscribers are invited to participate in the latest edition of Blogspeak Here.

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