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NEWS ARCHIVES ACROSS THEMES  
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Public Access
 


IOP Publishing's Materials Research Express to become fully gold OA journal from 2020
- 10 May 2019

IOP Publishing has announced that Materials Research Express (MRX) will become a fully gold open access journal from 2020 to reflect increasing demand for more accessible and open science.

All articles published in MRX from volume 7 (2020) onwards will be immediately free to read under a Creative Commons licence, providing maximum visibility and allowing authors to comply with any requirements for open access publication from institutions and funders.

Since its launch in 2013, MRX has published more than 6,200 articles, received submissions from over 90 countries, and has been cited nearly 10,000 times, becoming a central platform for the dissemination of high-quality, peer-reviewed research in all areas of materials science.

Under a fully gold open access model, MRX will provide authors with the widest possible global audience. The journal will also continue to prioritise excellence and rigour in the publishing service that it provides to the whole materials science community, including authors, reviewers and readers.

The change in publishing model will come into effect for all articles submitted to MRX from October 1, 2019, with no charge for any articles submitted during October 2019. Thereafter, the article publication charge (APC) will be GBP1,100, discounted to GBP825 until the end of 2020.

In line with the Research4Life programme, corresponding authors based in many lower income countries will receive a full fee waiver or discount.

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Springer Nature sets out new approach to accelerate transition to OA
- 08 May 2019

Springer Nature is seeking views on a new approach aimed at accelerating the transition to open access. In a recently published blog, Springer Nature sets out a new approach with the goal of increasing the demand from authors to immediately publish their research open access (OA) and growing the supply of journals able to publish OA, potentially enabling even highly selective journals such as Nature to transition to OA.

It is expected that this new approach would see publishers move from generally being passive enablers of open access to being active drivers of the transition to OA. Views are being sought on the proposed new publishing standard - Transformative Publishing - which encompasses two main elements: 'Transformative' read and publish deals and Transformative journals.

Transformative read and publish deals are already proven to accelerate the transition to OA by significantly increasing OA take up. Transformative Publishers would commit to offer them where institutions, consortia or research funding bodies wish to use them and to scale them when in place.

Publishers would commit to adapt the hybrid and subscription journals that they own so that, by complying with the required standard and set of requirements, Transformative journals would be 100 percent OA for primary research articles at the end of the transition.

Ultimately, transformative publishers would move to being at the forefront of measuring, reporting on, and promoting the benefits of OA and be required to commit to continuously increase the average level of OA take-up across its whole journal portfolio, at least at the rate of funding from research funding bodies, institutions and consortia.

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CRKN launches new CRKN Open Access Journals List
- 07 May 2019

The Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN) has announced the launch of the new CRKN Open Access Journals List. This list includes over 400 open access journals hosted at CRKN member institutions and covers a variety of disciplines.

According to Patricia Pang, Chair of CRKN's Serials Management Sub-Committee, CRKN Open Access Journals List aims to improve the discoverability of Canadian open access journals. The list helps researchers discover and access reputable, peer-reviewed, open access scholarship through a trusted source.

Formerly managed through Simon Fraser University Library's CUFTS software, the CRKN Open Access Journals List will be distributed to link resolvers to allow more researchers to retrieve open access content through library catalogues. The list is designed to supplement other open access lists and databases and provides a layer of review and reliability through regular additions and edits by librarians at local institutions.

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UKRI Open Access Review update: welcomes input from across the sector through public consultation
- 07 May 2019

As part of the ongoing Open Access Review, UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) will welcome input from across the sector later this year through public consultation.

Open Access aims to make the findings of publicly-funded research freely available online as soon as possible, in ways that will maximise re-use. This is central to UKRI's ambitions for research and innovation in the UK, as sharing new knowledge has benefits for researchers, the wider higher education sector, businesses, and others.

The UKRI Open Access Review concerns open access to formal scholarly research articles, peer-reviewed conference proceedings and monographs. It is an opportunity to align policies across UKRI's councils, with the UK Funding Bodies on future Research Excellence Framework (REF) policy, and to consider how Innovate UK should be included. The current Research Councils UK (RCUK) policy continues to apply over the period of the review. There will be no change to the REF 2021 open access policy.

The Open Access Review is being undertaken in four phases of work, which started in Autumn 2018 and will run to Spring 2020.

Throughout the Review UKRI will be engaging with a range of relevant stakeholders, and a public consultation on the draft UKRI policy will now take place later this year to allow further time for input from across the sector on the draft policy. The review is expected to report in March and 2020 and UKRI expects the revised policy to apply during 2020.

The REF is jointly governed by the four UK higher education funding bodies - Research England (part of UKRI); Scottish Funding Council; Higher Education Funding Council for Wales; The Department for the Economy (Northern Ireland). Although the REF Open Access policy is within scope of the UKRI review, the four UK funding bodies will make final decisions on the future policy for REF.

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Plan S drafters urged to 'stand their ground' in advance of a revised proposal
- 03 May 2019

European research funders are being urged to stay true to their original objective and make all journal papers published with their support free to read by 2020, when they present revised proposals later this month. The new draft of Plan S, now being coordinated by Robert Kiley of the Wellcome Trust, will be based on a recent public consultation.

Open access advocates want Plan S, which is backed by a growing number of influential national funding agencies and research charities in Europe and further, to keep the ambition shown in the original pitch last September.

The original blueprint for Plan S, masterminded by Robert-Jan Smits, the European Commission's open access envoy and the initial driving force, sets out a number of criteria that journals must meet before participating funders permit research they pay for to be published in them.

Some rules concern editorial policy, such that journals must allow authors to retain copyright. Researchers supported by the Plan S funders must publish their results either in open access journals, or, if they choose another publishing route, make a near-final copy of the manuscript available in an approved open repository.

Publishing charges will be met by funders or universities, rather than authors, with the draft promising a 'fair' cap on these charges. Other requirements cover technical issues. For instance, journals must provide full text in machine-readable formats, such as XML, to allow for text and data mining.

Publishers of high-profile subscription journals say they cannot comply with Plan S unless some of the draft rules are changed.

While changes are likely, Rebecca Lawrence, managing director of London-based open-access publisher F1000, argues that platforms like F1000, which offers almost-immediate publication of articles and other research outputs, demonstrates that viable, high-quality alternatives to subscription-based journals already exist. She is among those heralding Plan S as one of the most promising efforts to collapse paywalls in the world.

But there are worries among scientists who fear the scheme will restrict their choice of where to publish.

Several hundred researchers last year signed a letter condemning the initiative. The letter was coordinated by Lynn Kamerlin, biochemist at Uppsala University in Sweden who sits on the advisory board of F1000 Research, the publishing arm of F1000.

Lawrence says that the bigger the Plan S coalition gets, the more chance there is that subscription-based publishers will relent, and change their business models. Plan S, as written, would bar researchers from publishing in many influential (or 'prestige') journals.

Lawrence is encouraged by China's pledge of support for Plan S in December last year, which stunned many, and boosted expectations that other science superpowers will swing behind the plan in time. India's chief science adviser recently said his country, the third biggest producer of science papers in the world, would sign up.

However, the plan still lacks the support of some of Europe's science powerhouses, such as Switzerland and Germany.

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