blogs

Blogs selected for Week Dec 12 to Dec 18, 2016

1. Making research more accessible with Figshare Springer Nature wants to enable all of the authors and editors to publish the best research and promote wider access to research data, and other materials that support publications. To help achieve this, the company has introduced enhanced display and discovery of supplementary materials (additional files) in BioMed […]

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Blogs selected for Week Nov 28 to Dec 4, 2016

1. Institutional Conservatism in Scholarly Communications: Thoughts from UKSG’s One-day Conference A recent UKSG conference explored what researchers need from scholarly communications, and whether the provisions of publishers, libraries and others are keeping up. Once again, the biggest frustration is rooted not in publisher / library services but in institutional structures for recognition, notes Charlie […]

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Blogs selected for Week Nov 21 to Nov 27, 2016

1. Surviving work as an academic in the age of measuring impact Views that academics can avoid the problems of work and aren’t experienced in the ‘real world’ are wrong, writes Jane Tinkler, in her post in The Impact Blog. Precarious employment, balancing teaching, research and publishing demands and demonstrating impact are very real pressures. […]

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Blogs selected for Week Nov 14 to Nov 20, 2016

1. What We Can Learn from Fake News Fake News is making headlines as questions about how dubious stories may have influenced the US election. In her post in the Scholarly Kitchen Blog, Angela Cochran explores the damage done to reputable news organisations and what scholarly publishers could learn from the whole thing. The blog […]

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Blogs selected for Week Nov 7 to Nov 13, 2016

1. How Wrong Is Greta Van Susteren about Libraries? Is Greta Van Susteren right in taking universities to task for building “huge libraries” and in characterizing them as “vanity projects” that have been obviated by the growing online availability of books and other scholarly resources? Obviously not – that’s the position of an ignorant philistine, […]

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Blogs selected for Week Oct 31 to Nov 6, 2016

1. Access to Science Research for Everyone The greatest validation of scientific contribution is a peer-reviewed academic publication. But the face of academic publishing is changing as traditional journal publishers have come under attack from proponents of open access, which could change the mode of knowledge distribution in the sciences as we know it, discusses […]

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Blogs selected for Week Oct 24 to Oct 30, 2016

1. The impact of article processing charges on libraries and what is being done to help Following significant growth in gold open access publishing, Katie Shamash, in her post in The Impact Blog , looks at the available APC data and picks out some key insights. APCs are now an increasingly significant portion of institutions’ […]

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Blogs selected for Week Oct 17 to Oct 23, 2016

1. Revisiting: The Editorial Fallacy The notion of the “editorial fallacy”, the misconception that all a publisher must focus on is producing high quality material, has popped up recently in several posts. In this post in the Scholarly Kitchen Blog, Joseph Esposito revisits his 2010 post on the disruptive publishing environment, in which publishers cannot […]

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Blogs selected for Week Oct 10 to Oct 16, 2016

1. A Taxonomy of University Presses Today University presses bring a diversity not only of costs, scale, and business models, but also of organisational capacity, incentives, and objectives. As efforts are mounted to transition monograph publishing to open access, it is vital that we recognise the richness and complexity of this community, notes Roger C. […]

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Blogs selected for Week Oct 3 to Oct 9, 2016

1. Open access to high energy physics assured to 2019 by SCOAP3 Open access publishing is now mainstream in biology and medicine, but it is less popular in the natural sciences. In her post in the BioMed Central Blog, Grace Baynes examines a partnership between CERN and Springer Nature that’s promoting open access publishing in […]

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